Death toll up to 32 in Miami Beach-area condo building collapse

32 people were confirmed dead in the partial collapsed condo building in Miami Beach. This is the 13th day of ongoing searches for victims. During a morning news briefing, Daniella Levine Cava, Miami-Dade County Mayor, stated that four bodies were found overnight. She said that 26 of the victims were identified. Although 113 people are still "potentially missing," only 70 people were confirmed to be in Champlain Towers South, Surfside, when the other half collapsed in the early hours of June 24, she stated. As detectives attempt to audit the missing persons list since the collapse, numbers of those accounted for now stand at 191, while people unaccounted have fluctuated. Levine Cava stated that it has been difficult for relatives to reach missing persons who initially called to report them missing, which makes "it very difficult to establish if an individual is actually in the building." She encouraged family members to contact her with any additional information if it was possible. Image: On July 5, 2021, rescue workers moved a stretcher with recovered remains to the site of the Champlain Towers South condominium building that collapsed in Surfside, Fla. (Lynne Slodky / Associated Press) Lightning caused search efforts to be temporarily halted overnight. Officials are continuing to monitor Tropical Storm Elsa. Levine Cava stated that "we continue to expect gusts, strong showers today." Charles Burkett, Surfside Mayor, stated that the wind was already affecting large cranes carrying heavy debris. He acknowledged that the wind can be a challenge, but they are trying to work around it right now. However, he stated that crews "are working nonstop 24 hours a days, seven days a semaine, to remove every victim from the pile that once contained a 12-story building." He stated that he was working closely with Levine Cava in order to arrange family visits to the site. Around 10:30 p.m. on Sunday, the remaining portion of the 40-year old building was demolished. Levine Cava stated that this has allowed rescue and search teams to examine more debris, without fearing that the building could collapse. Crews couldn't work on the debris pile because of its instability, which caused delays and intermittent pauses. Continue the story The demolition was completed in 20 minutes and heavy equipment is now allowed to enter the site. Search and rescue teams were able return to work immediately. Related: Never give up. A first responder advised that you go through each and every part of the pile. South Florida buildings have been subject to increased scrutiny since the collapse. The cause is still under investigation. Officials in Miami have started a review of the structural integrity all condo high-rises that are above five stories. A North Miami condo complex was evacuated Friday as part of the audit. Burkett stated that a "deep dive" inspection was being done on sister Champlain Towers North. It was constructed around the same time and probably with the same materials as the south building. If residents of the building decide to move, they have other housing options. Burkett stated that "we have deep concerns about this building, especially as we don't know what has occurred here." Officials have released documents that revealed earlier concerns about Champlain Towers South's structural integrity. According to a 2018 report, Frank Morabito, an engineer consultant, found that the underground parking garage was experiencing "abundant cracking and crumbling". Morabito suggested that the concrete slabs at the entrance and pool deck were removed and completely replaced. Morabito recommended that concrete slabs "be removed and replaced in their entirety" as the concrete was in serious condition. Cassondra BilledeauStratton reported that the pool was sucked into a huge sinkhole just before it collapsed. The National Institute of Standards and Technology and local agencies are working together to determine what caused half of the building to collapse. Levine Cava stated that the findings will lead to "policy changes at all levels" in order to prevent this from happening again.

0 Comments

Post a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

0 comments