Vitamin D supplementation not associated with reduced cardiovascular events

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Bottom Line: This study, called a meta-analysis, combined the results of 21 randomized clinical trials with about 83,000 patients to look at whether vitamin D supplementation was associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease events such as heart attack or stroke. Some observational studies have suggested an association between low blood levels of vitamin D and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease events. This study reports that compared with placebo, vitamin D supplementation wasn’t associated with a reduction in major adverse cardiovascular events (heart attack, stroke or death from cardiovascular disease) or overall death. The results were similar between different doses of vitamin D and for men and women. A limitation of the study is that the definition of major adverse cardiovascular events varied between the clinical trials.

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Authors: Mahmoud Barbarawi, M.D., Michigan State University, Flint, and coauthors

(doi:10.1001/jamacardio.2019.1870)

Editor’s Note: The article contains conflict of interest disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

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