Sega Will Release The Genesis Mini On September 19

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Sega will release its the Sega Genesis Mini worldwide on September 19, it said today. It will include 40 different games, and at least some versions will have Gunstar Heroes and Castlevania Bloodlines.

Sega made the announcement on stage at Sega Fes 2019, its annual fan event in Tokyo. It only announced games for the Japanese Mega Drive Mini, including Sonic 2, Puyo Puyo 2, Shining Force, Castlevania Bloodlines, Powerball, Gunstar Heroes, Comix Zone, Rent-a-Hero, Space Harrier II, and Madou Monogatari Ichi. Since a few of these games are Japan-only, it stands to reason that the U.S. and European lineups will be different.

In a later presentation at Sega Fes, Sega said that M2, the developer behind Sega Ages, is creating the software for the device. It also said that the system will include different regional variations of some games. For example, the Mega Drive Mini in Japan will include the U.S., European, and Japanese versions of Castlevania: Bloodlines. It didn’t say if the overseas versions of the device would similarly contain different regional variations, but it seems likely.

While Sega was light on details about the Mini in its stage presentation, it did say the 6-button controller would be the same size as the original’s, and that the games would have a save-anywhere function. The menu music for the device was composed by legendary Streets Of Rage composer Yuzo Koshiro, which is totally wild.

In Japan at least, it will be sold in two variations: with one controller for 6,980 yen (about $60), and with two controllers for 8,980 yen (about $80). Sega did not immediately announce the pricing or any specific games for the U.S. version.

Sega first announced the Mega Drive Mini at last year’s Sega Fes, and it was originally supposed to be released in 2018 only in Japan and based on the same AtGames-developed technology that powered the U.S. exclusive Genesis Flashback HD. Later, it delayed the unit into 2019, saying that it to achieve a higher level of quality, it would drop AtGames, develop the software for the system in Japan, and release the unit worldwide.

Given the generally negative critical reception to the Flashback HD, especially compared to Nintendo’s mini classic systems, Sega seems like it’s aiming to salvage its brand’s reputation in the classic-console market.