President Trump in the UK: Live updates

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What we’re covering here What we’re covering here

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  • UK visit: President Trump is in the United Kingdom.
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  • What he’s doing there: He’s meeting with Prime Minister Theresa May and Queen Elizabeth II.
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  • Expected protests: The US embassy warned American citizens in the UK to “keep a low profile” amid fears that protests could turn violent. The largest demonstration is expected in central London on Friday, where a giant “Trump baby” balloon will fly.

President Trump and first lady Melania Trump spent their first day in the United Kingdom at a formal dinner at Blenheim Palace, the fabled 18th century estate in Oxfordshire.

The Trumps were greeted by British Prime Minister Theresa May and participated in an arrival ceremony Thursday before attending the black-tie dinner in one of the palace’s several gilded ballrooms. They will be returning to London via helicopter later that night to stay at Winfield House, the vast residence of US Ambassador to the UK Woody Johnson.

Friday is also a busy day. Here’s what it looks like:

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  • Trump and May will visit a defense site “to witness a demonstration of the UK’s cutting-edge military capabilities and integrated UK-US military training,” according to a spokeswoman for May.
  • t

  • They will then travel to Chequers, the Prime Minister’s official country retreat, for bilateral talks on foreign policy, to be followed by a news conference.
  • t

  • The President and the first lady will then go on to Windsor Castle, where they’ll meet the Queen and sit down for tea in one of the drawing rooms.
  • t

  • Later that evening, the Trumps will travel to Scotland, where the President owns two golf properties, Trump Turnberry and Trump Aberdeen. It’s not yet been confirmed whether the President will play golf while there for the weekend.

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders released a statement Thursday, following President Trump’s interview with The Sun newspaper criticizing British Prime Minister Teresa May over the Brexit deal.

Here’s what Sanders said:

“The President likes and respects Prime Minister May very much. As he said in his interview with The Sun she ‘is a very good person’ and he ‘never said anything bad about her.’ He thought she was great on NATO today and is a really terrific person. He is thankful for the wonderful welcome from the prime minister here in the UK.”

In The Sun interview, Trump said May “didn’t listen” to his views on how she should negotiate the UK’s exit from the European Union, but said that was “fine.”

“She should negotiate the best way she knows how, but it’s too bad what’s going on,” Trump said.

Trump was greeted by May in a ceremony full of pomp and circumstance Thursday evening just hours before the interview was released.

President Trump described Queen Elizabeth II as a “tremendous woman” in an interview with The Sun newspaper.

The President and first lady Melania Trump will sit down with the Queen for tea Friday inside one of Windsor Castle’s drawing rooms.

“She is a tremendous woman,” he told the newspaper. “I really look forward to meeting her. I think she represents her country so well.”

He continued: “If you think of it, for so many years she has represented her country, she has really never made a mistake. You don’t see, like, anything embarrassing. She is just an incredible woman.”

Trump also said the first lady was a fan of the Queen.

President Trump, in a wide ranging interview with The Sun newspaper, said he felt the UK was “losing its culture” because of immigration.

“I think you are losing your culture. Look around. You go through certain areas that didn’t exist ten or 15 years ago,” he told The Sun.

The President also took issue with the wave of immigration coming into Europe.

“I think what has happened to Europe is a shame,” he told the newspaper. “Allowing the immigration to take place in Europe is a shame. I think it changed the fabric of Europe and, unless you act very quickly, it’s never going to be what it was and I don’t mean that in a positive way. So I think allowing millions and millions of people to come into Europe is very, very sad.

President Donald Trump said in an interview with The Sun that he feels “unwelcome” in London.

“I used to love London as a city. I haven’t been there in a long time. But when they make you feel unwelcome, why would I stay there?” the President told the newspaper.

Addressing the issue of the giant inflatable “Trump baby” that will fly above London on Friday, he said, “I guess when they put out blimps to make me feel unwelcome, no reason for me to go to London.”

Trump did say, however, that the British public like him and that “many people are delighted.”

President Trump has continued his feud with London Mayor Sadiq Khan in an interview with the British newspaper The Sun.

Trump said Khan had “done a very bad job on terrorism” and a “terrible job in London.”

“I think he has done a bad job on crime, if you look, all of the horrible things going on there, with all of the crime that is being brought in,” Trump told The Sun.

Trump also took issue with the fact that he felt Khan had not been respectful to him.

He continued: “I think he has not been hospitable to a government that is very important. Now he might not like the current President, but I represent the United States. I also represent a lot of people in Europe because a lot of people from Europe are in the United States.”

Some background: Long before Trump became president, he was trading barbs with Khan. After Khan was elected as London’s first Muslim mayor in 2016, he frequently criticized Trump and described his views of Islam as ignorant. Trump called for an IQ test between him and the mayor to determine who’s smarter.

The spats continued even after Trump was elected president. In June last year, Trump slammed Khan in a tweet shortly after a terror attack in London.

President Trump, in an interview covering many topics with The Sun newspaper in the UK, said the former British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson would make “a great prime minister.”

Boris Johnson quit as foreign secretary Monday over a Brexit plan that he did not agree with.

Trump described Johnson as “a very talented guy.”

He continued: “I have a lot of respect for Boris. He obviously likes me, and says very good things about me. I was very saddened to see he was leaving government and I hope he goes back in at some point. I think he is a great representative for your country.”

Trump refused to be drawn into saying if Johnson should replace Theresa May as prime minister.

“I am not pitting one against the other,” he told The Sun. “I am just saying I think he would be a great Prime Minister. I think he’s got what it takes.”

President Donald Trump touched down in the United Kingdom Thursday and spoke with a major British tabloid where he differed with British Prime Minister Theresa May on her approach to Brexit.

“I told her how to do it. That will be up to her to say. But I told her how to do it. She wanted to go a different route,” Trump said, according to audio of an interview posted by The Sun.

Trump said May “didn’t listen” to his views on how she should negotiate the UK’s exit from the European Union, but said that was “fine.”

“She should negotiate the best way she knows how, but it’s too bad what’s going on,” Trump said.

Trump’s comments in the interview are an extraordinary criticism of a foreign leader during a trip to that leader’s country. Trump was greeted by May in a ceremony full of pomp and circumstance Thursday evening just hours before the interview was released.

Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Texas were also mentioned in British Prime Minister Theresa May’s speech Thursday night at Blenheim Palace.

What do they have in common? President Trump carried all four states in the 2016 presidential election. May is trying to make clear trade relationships are mutually beneficial.

Here’s what May said:

“Tomorrow morning, around 24,000 men and women in Michigan will get up and go to work for a UK-owned company. Another 40,000 will do the same in Ohio. Sixty thousand in Pennsylvania. In Texas, British employers provide work for an incredible 100,000 people. Altogether, from Maine to Alaska, more than a million Americans work for British companies.”

What we’re covering here

    t

  • UK visit: President Trump is in the United Kingdom.
  • t

  • What he’s doing there: He’s meeting with Prime Minister Theresa May and Queen Elizabeth II.
  • t

  • Expected protests: The US embassy warned American citizens in the UK to “keep a low profile” amid fears that protests could turn violent. The largest demonstration is expected in central London on Friday, where a giant “Trump baby” balloon will fly.

President Trump and first lady Melania Trump spent their first day in the United Kingdom at a formal dinner at Blenheim Palace, the fabled 18th century estate in Oxfordshire.

The Trumps were greeted by British Prime Minister Theresa May and participated in an arrival ceremony Thursday before attending the black-tie dinner in one of the palace’s several gilded ballrooms. They will be returning to London via helicopter later that night to stay at Winfield House, the vast residence of US Ambassador to the UK Woody Johnson.

Friday is also a busy day. Here’s what it looks like:

    t

  • Trump and May will visit a defense site “to witness a demonstration of the UK’s cutting-edge military capabilities and integrated UK-US military training,” according to a spokeswoman for May.
  • t

  • They will then travel to Chequers, the Prime Minister’s official country retreat, for bilateral talks on foreign policy, to be followed by a news conference.
  • t

  • The President and the first lady will then go on to Windsor Castle, where they’ll meet the Queen and sit down for tea in one of the drawing rooms.
  • t

  • Later that evening, the Trumps will travel to Scotland, where the President owns two golf properties, Trump Turnberry and Trump Aberdeen. It’s not yet been confirmed whether the President will play golf while there for the weekend.

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders released a statement Thursday, following President Trump’s interview with The Sun newspaper criticizing British Prime Minister Teresa May over the Brexit deal.

Here’s what Sanders said:

“The President likes and respects Prime Minister May very much. As he said in his interview with The Sun she ‘is a very good person’ and he ‘never said anything bad about her.’ He thought she was great on NATO today and is a really terrific person. He is thankful for the wonderful welcome from the prime minister here in the UK.”

In The Sun interview, Trump said May “didn’t listen” to his views on how she should negotiate the UK’s exit from the European Union, but said that was “fine.”

“She should negotiate the best way she knows how, but it’s too bad what’s going on,” Trump said.

Trump was greeted by May in a ceremony full of pomp and circumstance Thursday evening just hours before the interview was released.

President Trump described Queen Elizabeth II as a “tremendous woman” in an interview with The Sun newspaper.

The President and first lady Melania Trump will sit down with the Queen for tea Friday inside one of Windsor Castle’s drawing rooms.

“She is a tremendous woman,” he told the newspaper. “I really look forward to meeting her. I think she represents her country so well.”

He continued: “If you think of it, for so many years she has represented her country, she has really never made a mistake. You don’t see, like, anything embarrassing. She is just an incredible woman.”

Trump also said the first lady was a fan of the Queen.

President Trump, in a wide ranging interview with The Sun newspaper, said he felt the UK was “losing its culture” because of immigration.

“I think you are losing your culture. Look around. You go through certain areas that didn’t exist ten or 15 years ago,” he told The Sun.

The President also took issue with the wave of immigration coming into Europe.

“I think what has happened to Europe is a shame,” he told the newspaper. “Allowing the immigration to take place in Europe is a shame. I think it changed the fabric of Europe and, unless you act very quickly, it’s never going to be what it was and I don’t mean that in a positive way. So I think allowing millions and millions of people to come into Europe is very, very sad.

President Donald Trump said in an interview with The Sun that he feels “unwelcome” in London.

“I used to love London as a city. I haven’t been there in a long time. But when they make you feel unwelcome, why would I stay there?” the President told the newspaper.

Addressing the issue of the giant inflatable “Trump baby” that will fly above London on Friday, he said, “I guess when they put out blimps to make me feel unwelcome, no reason for me to go to London.”

Trump did say, however, that the British public like him and that “many people are delighted.”

President Trump has continued his feud with London Mayor Sadiq Khan in an interview with the British newspaper The Sun.

Trump said Khan had “done a very bad job on terrorism” and a “terrible job in London.”

“I think he has done a bad job on crime, if you look, all of the horrible things going on there, with all of the crime that is being brought in,” Trump told The Sun.

Trump also took issue with the fact that he felt Khan had not been respectful to him.

He continued: “I think he has not been hospitable to a government that is very important. Now he might not like the current President, but I represent the United States. I also represent a lot of people in Europe because a lot of people from Europe are in the United States.”

Some background: Long before Trump became president, he was trading barbs with Khan. After Khan was elected as London’s first Muslim mayor in 2016, he frequently criticized Trump and described his views of Islam as ignorant. Trump called for an IQ test between him and the mayor to determine who’s smarter.

The spats continued even after Trump was elected president. In June last year, Trump slammed Khan in a tweet shortly after a terror attack in London.

President Trump, in an interview covering many topics with The Sun newspaper in the UK, said the former British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson would make “a great prime minister.”

Boris Johnson quit as foreign secretary Monday over a Brexit plan that he did not agree with.

Trump described Johnson as “a very talented guy.”

He continued: “I have a lot of respect for Boris. He obviously likes me, and says very good things about me. I was very saddened to see he was leaving government and I hope he goes back in at some point. I think he is a great representative for your country.”

Trump refused to be drawn into saying if Johnson should replace Theresa May as prime minister.

“I am not pitting one against the other,” he told The Sun. “I am just saying I think he would be a great Prime Minister. I think he’s got what it takes.”

President Donald Trump touched down in the United Kingdom Thursday and spoke with a major British tabloid where he differed with British Prime Minister Theresa May on her approach to Brexit.

“I told her how to do it. That will be up to her to say. But I told her how to do it. She wanted to go a different route,” Trump said, according to audio of an interview posted by The Sun.

Trump said May “didn’t listen” to his views on how she should negotiate the UK’s exit from the European Union, but said that was “fine.”

“She should negotiate the best way she knows how, but it’s too bad what’s going on,” Trump said.

Trump’s comments in the interview are an extraordinary criticism of a foreign leader during a trip to that leader’s country. Trump was greeted by May in a ceremony full of pomp and circumstance Thursday evening just hours before the interview was released.

Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Texas were also mentioned in British Prime Minister Theresa May’s speech Thursday night at Blenheim Palace.

What do they have in common? President Trump carried all four states in the 2016 presidential election. May is trying to make clear trade relationships are mutually beneficial.

Here’s what May said:

“Tomorrow morning, around 24,000 men and women in Michigan will get up and go to work for a UK-owned company. Another 40,000 will do the same in Ohio. Sixty thousand in Pennsylvania. In Texas, British employers provide work for an incredible 100,000 people. Altogether, from Maine to Alaska, more than a million Americans work for British companies.”