POLITICO Playbook: Guess who else voted against federal funding for abortion?

7

THE THING ABOUT THE HYDE AMENDMENT … Over the last day, there’s been a pile-on on JOE BIDEN — Beto O’Rourke, Elizabeth Warren and others have ganged up against the former VP over his support of the Hyde Amendment, language that prohibits most federal funding for abortion.

BUT … If you are or have been a member of Congress — 15 people in this field — and you’ve voted for big spending packages, there’s a pretty good chance that you’ve also voted for the amendment. OF COURSE, Biden is actively supporting it, and that’s a bit unique. But this language has been a part of a lot of funding bills and gotten plenty of votes from Democrats over the years.

AN EXAMPLE: ELIZABETH WARREN SAYS SHE DOESN’T LIKE THE HYDE AMENDMENT … Warren told MSNBC’s Chris Hayes on Wednesday night that “we do not pass laws that take away the freedom from the women who are most vulnerable.” Her team tweeted: “I will not support any effort to take rights away from women who are the most vulnerable. It’s time for Hyde to go. #WarrenTownHall”

… BUT, OF COURSE, SHE’S VOTED FOR IT! It doesn’t take long to find an example of Warren voting for the Hyde Amendment. Take this bill, which funded a big chunk of the government last year.

IT INCLUDED this language: “(a) None of the funds appropriated in this Act, and none of the funds in any trust fund to which funds are appropriated in this Act, shall be expended for any abortion. (b) None of the funds appropriated in this Act, and none of the funds in any trust fund to which funds are appropriated in this Act, shall be expended for health benefits coverage that includes coverage of abortion.”

WARREN voted for this bill twice. So did Michael Bennet, Cory Booker, Kirsten Gillibrand, Kamala Harris, Amy Klobuchar, Beto O’Rourke, Eric Swalwell and others. Bernie Sanders voted no. President DONALD TRUMP signed it into law.

TARIFF UPDATE … TRUMP this morning in Ireland, via pooler Gabby Orr: “‘Mexico was in yesterday. They’re coming back this morning … I think a lot of progress was made yesterday, but we need to make a lot of progress. …

“We’re having a great talk with Mexico. We’ll see what happens, but something pretty dramatic could happen. We’ve told Mexico the tariffs go on, and I mean it too. And I’m very happy with it. And a lot of people, senators included, they have no idea what they’re talking about when it comes to tariffs. They have absolutely no idea. When you have the money, when you have the product, when you have the thing that everybody wants, you’re in a position to do very well with tariffs and that’s where we are.”

— MEANWHILE, BACK HOME … “Republicans at war over Trump’s tariffs,” by Burgess Everett, Melanie Zanona and Marianne LeVine

THE STORY EVERYONE WILL BE TALKING ABOUT … HEATHER CAYGLE: “Pelosi tells Dems she wants to see Trump ‘in prison'”: “Speaker Nancy Pelosi told senior Democrats that she’d like to see President Donald Trump ‘in prison’ as she clashed with House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler in a meeting on Tuesday night over whether to launch impeachment proceedings. …

“Nadler pressed Pelosi to allow his committee to launch an impeachment inquiry against Trump – the second such request he’s made in recent weeks only to be rebuffed by the California Democrat and other senior leaders. Pelosi stood firm, reiterating that she wasn’t open to the idea of impeaching Trump at this time.

“‘I don’t want to see him impeached, I want to see him in prison,’ Pelosi said, according to multiple Democratic sources familiar with the meeting. … In Tuesday’s meeting, some committee chairs expressed frustration about the appearance that rank-and-file members – rather than party leaders – were leading the caucus’ oversight strategy, including what they do on impeachment, according to one source familiar with the meeting.” POLITICO

Good Thursday morning.

HAPPENING TODAY — “World marks 75 years since D-Day in solemn observances,” by AP’s Raf Casert and John Leicester at Omaha Beach, France: “The five beaches are silent at dawn but forever haunted. As the sun rose Thursday over the Normandy coastline where thousands of men bled and died 75 years ago, a fast-diminishing number of World War II veterans remembered D-Day and hoped the world never forgets the sacrifices made to dismantle Nazi tyranny.

“The sea of mercury blue couldn’t have been more peaceful as day broke over Omaha Beach, the first of five code-named beaches where the waters ran red the morning of June 6, 1944, when Allied forces came ashore to push the Nazis out of France. Hundreds of people, civilians and military alike, hailing from around the world, gathered at the water’s edge, remembering the troops who stormed the fortified Normandy beaches to help turn the tide of the war and give birth to a new Europe, since at peace.

“On the western edge of Omaha, dense crowds formed a human chain and tossed red and white chrysanthemums into the gently lapping waves, remembering. Veterans’ descendants spoke about family members who fought on the beach and laid red roses at the feet of a statue of an infantryman clutching a rifle and hauling a fallen comrade.” AP

— TRUMP and first lady MELANIA TRUMP are in Normandy for the commemoration. The two will attend an Omaha Beach briefing, fly-over viewing and viewing of the Normandy American Cemetery.

DEPT. OF WHAT COULD GO WRONG? … WAPO: “Trump to speak at Lincoln Memorial during Fourth of July celebration”: “Trump’s appearance is likely to bring with it a host of new security and logistical challenges and reshape a decades-old, nonpartisan celebration that annually draws hundreds of thousands of visitors to the city’s monumental core.”

There are wrong and right prescriptions for changing Medicare. Seniors need Washington to focus on the right ones. Cutting costs for everyone except seniors and limiting access to lifesaving medicines are the wrong prescription for Medicare. Making changes that help seniors pay less out-of-pocket are the right prescription for Medicare.

SCOOP — “In secret recording, Pompeo opens up about Venezuelan opposition, says keeping it united ‘has proven devilishly difficult,'” by WaPo’s John Hudson: “Secretary of State Mike Pompeo offered a candid assessment of Venezuela’s opposition during a closed-door meeting in New York last week, saying that the opponents of President Nicolás Maduro are highly fractious and that U.S. efforts to keep them together have been more difficult than is publicly known.

“‘Our conundrum, which is to keep the opposition united, has proven devilishly difficult,’ Pompeo said in an audio recording obtained by The Washington Post. ‘The moment Maduro leaves, everybody’s going to raise their hands and [say], “Take me, I’m the next president of Venezuela.” It would be forty-plus people who believe they’re the rightful heir to Maduro.'” WaPo

MILESTONE: “Venezuela has overtaken China to become the No. 1 country of origin for those claiming asylum in the U.S. upon arrival or shortly after, with nearly 30,000 Venezuelans applying for asylum with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services in 2018. Nearly one-third of claims filed with the agency come from Venezuelans, the most of any country by far, according to the latest data.” Via Molly O’Toole in the L.A. Times

CNN’S PHIL MATTINGLY, ZACHARY COHEN and JEREMY HERB: “Exclusive: U.S. intel shows Saudi Arabia escalated its missile program with help from China”: “The U.S. government has obtained intelligence that Saudi Arabia has significantly escalated its ballistic missile program with the help of China, three sources with direct knowledge of the matter said, a development that threatens decades of U.S. efforts to limit missile proliferation in the Middle East.” CNN

By signing up you agree to receive email newsletters or alerts from POLITICO. You can unsubscribe at any time.

THE CUT-‘N-PASTE PRIMARY … NATASHA KORECKI and MARC CAPUTO: “It’s not just Biden: Multiple Democrats lift material from other sites”: “Twenty-four hours after Joe Biden’s campaign was taken to task for lifting portions of a climate change plan without citation, it’s clear that the former vice president has plenty of company. A sampling of policy proposals from Biden’s leading rivals suggests the lifting of direct text from academic papers, think tanks or policy institutes – and the cribbing of facts without attribution – is fairly widespread on 2020 campaign websites.

“A POLITICO review found previously published material on the official campaign websites of Sens. Kamala Harris and Bernie Sanders, as well as frequent use of facts and data without citation on a number of others. ‘More than 1 million women in America today have been shot or shot at by an intimate partner,’ Harris writes under the gender equality section of her website. Everytown, the gun safety group, has a remarkably similar line on its own site, with one minor difference in scale: ‘Nearly 1 million women alive today have been shot, or shot at, by an intimate partner.'” POLITICO

2020 WATCH — “Poll shows Biden beating Trump in Texas,” by Caitlin Oprysko: “A new poll out Wednesday spells danger for President Donald Trump’s reelection chances in one of the unlikeliest of places: Texas. The Quinnipiac University poll shows that Biden would top Trump by four points – 48 percent to 44 percent – in a general election matchup there, an outcome the ruby red state hasn’t seen in four decades.” POLITICO

— “DNC opts against climate change debate, Inslee says,” by Anthony Adragna: “Washington Gov. Jay Inslee said Wednesday the [DNC] informed him it will not dedicate one of its presidential primary debates to the issue of climate change. The decision comes despite a furious push from progressive and environmental advocates for a climate change debate, as well as strong support across the Democratic ideological spectrum. …

“Inslee, who led the push among presidential candidates and has made climate change the centerpiece of his campaign, called the decision ‘deeply disappointing’ and out of step with Democratic primary voters. He also said the organization threatened not to invite him to future debates if he participated in any other climate change debate.” POLITICO

There are wrong and right prescriptions for changing Medicare. Seniors need Washington to focus on the right ones. Learn more.

TRUMP’S THURSDAY — After their viewing of the American Cemetery in Normandy, Trump and Melania Trump will depart at 12:25 en route to a bilateral meeting and working lunch with French President Emmanuel Macron. They will then travel back to Doonbeg, Ireland.

OUCH … WAPO’S ROBIN GIVHAN: “[Trump’s] waistcoat was too long and too tight. The tailcoat did not fit … And the man himself looked so ill at ease in the whole unfortunate kit that his awkwardness loomed over him like Pig-Pen’s dust cloud.” WaPo

WASHINGTON INC. — “Chamber announces Clark as new president; Donohue to remain as CEO,” by WaPo’s James Hohmann and Tom Hamburger: “The U.S. Chamber of Commerce announced Wednesday that Suzanne P. Clark will become president of the organization and Thomas J. Donohue will stay on as CEO of the influential business lobby for another three years. …

“‘I’m not a spring chicken,’ Donohue said in an interview. ‘Part of this is to achieve two things with the same action. One is to assure our financers, our members and our governments that I am going to be here for a while. The second is to demonstrate that we have continuity of management and that we’re continuing to expand and develop our organization.’ …

“The board of directors plans to conduct a global search for Donohue’s replacement in 2022, which will include internal and external candidates.” WaPo

THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATION — “State Dept. Forces Out Official Who Worked on Plan That Led to Ex-Employer’s Arms Deals,” by WSJ’s Dion Nissenbaum and Alex Leary: “Charles Faulkner, who previously represented Raytheon Co., took part in an unusual Trump administration move to declare an emergency over tensions with Iran to fast-track $8 billion in arms sales to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, circumventing normal congressional review, these people said.

“He resigned as a deputy assistant secretary at the State Department in early May after working on efforts leading to the emergency declaration, these people said. Mr. Faulkner’s role in the process has raised concerns in Congress, where Democratic lawmakers want to know if Mr. Faulkner violated Trump administration ethics rules by taking part in discussions on the declaration, which cleared the way for Raytheon’s $2 billion deal to sell precision-guided missiles to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.” WSJ

THE INVESTIGATIONS — “Senate Intelligence Committee summons mysterious British security consultant,” by Natasha Bertrand: “Senate investigators have added yet another name to the constantly evolving cast of characters in the Russia investigation.

“On April 5, just 2 weeks after special counsel Robert Mueller submitted his final report on Russia’s election interference, the Senate Intelligence Committee sent a letter to a British security consultant named Walter Soriano asking for a voluntary, closed-door interview and documents with various Russia probe figures dating back to June 2015.

“The letter, obtained by Politico, offers yet another window into the panel’s secretive – but largely bipartisan – two-year-old investigation, and reveals the investigators’ interest in what, if any, role Israel may have played in attempts to manipulate the 2016 election.” POLITICO

Seniors need Washington to focus on the right prescription for changing Medicare. Learn more.

PLAYBOOK METRO SECTION — “Parents Gone Wild: High Drama Inside D.C.’s Most Elite Private School: At Sidwell Friends, the high school of Chelsea Clinton and the Obama children, college counselors find themselves besieged by Ivy-obsessed families,” by Adam Harris in The Atlantic

FOR YOUR RADAR — “Schools Are Deploying Massive Digital Surveillance Systems. The Results Are Alarming,” by Education Week’s Benjamin Herold

— WHOOPS: “A teacher just got fired for asking Trump to deport undocumented students,” by CNN’s Paul Murphy and Chuck Johnston: “A Texas high school teacher who thought she was private messaging anti-immigration tweets to President Donald Trump has been fired for asking the President to deport undocumented students.

“‘[Fort Worth] ISD is loaded with illegal students from Mexico,’ Georgia Clark said in a series of tweets on May 17. ‘I really do need a contact here in FW who should be actively investigating & removing illegals that are in the public school system.’

“Clark has been a high school English teacher in the Fort Worth Independent School District since 1998, the district said.” CNN

— HMM: “Military to spend a month painting border barriers to ‘improve aesthetic appearance,'” by CBS’ Camilo Montoya-Galvez: “In its notification to Congress, DHS said painting of border barriers in Tucson, Arizona had allowed Border Patrol to combat the ‘camouflaging tactics of illegal border crossers’ who sought to evade detection. The agency said migrants also appeared to have ‘greater difficulty’ scaling painted bollards along the border.

“On Twitter, Illinois Sen. Dick Durbin, the second-highest Democrat in the Senate, denounced the task as a ‘disgraceful misuse of taxpayer money.’ ‘Our military has more important work to do than making Trump’s wall beautiful,’ he added.” CBS

— AP/UN: “A United Nations emergency relief coordinator says more than 2 million men, women and children could die of starvation in Somalia by summer’s end if international aid is not sent quickly to the drought-stricken African country.” AP

HOW WASHINGTON WORKS — @davelevinthal: “In May, as congressional representatives were grilling @Boeing executives about two 737-800 MAX crashes, Boeing’s PAC was donating money to the campaigns of dozens of members of Congress.”

By signing up you agree to receive email newsletters or alerts from POLITICO. You can unsubscribe at any time.

VALLEY TALK — “Tech Giants Amass a Lobbying Army for an Epic Washington Battle,” by NYT’s Cecilia Kang and Ken Vogel: “Initially slow to develop a presence in Washington, the tech giants – Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google – have rapidly built themselves into some of the largest players in the influence and access industry as they confront threats from the Trump administration and both parties on Capitol Hill.

“The four companies spent a combined $55 million on lobbying last year, doubling their combined spending of $27.4 million in 2016, and some are spending at a higher rate so far this year, according to the Center for Responsive Politics.” NYT

MEDIAWATCH — Americans think ‘made-up news’ is a bigger problem than climate change”: “U.S. adults are more likely to say that ‘made-up news/info’ is a big problem than they are to identify climate change, racism, terrorism, or sexism as such, according to a study out from the Pew Research Center Wednesday: Fifty percent of those surveyed said made-up news (the artist formerly known as ‘fake news’) is a ‘very big problem’ in the United States. By comparison, 46 percent called climate change a ‘very big problem’; 40 percent said the same about racism; 34 percent said the same about terrorism.” Nieman Lab …

— DEPT. OF STRANGE BEDFELLOWS: “‘She sounds like Trump at his best’: Tucker Carlson endorses Elizabeth Warren’s economic populism,” by WaPo’s Isaac Stanley-Becker: “Tucker Carlson of Fox News spent nearly three minutes of his opening monologue on Wednesday quoting verbatim from the economic plan unveiled this week by Sen. Elizabeth Warren … But his intention was not to disparage it. Hardly. He told Republicans … that they were voting against their own economic interests by backing candidates who did not speak like the consumer protection advocate and former Harvard Law School professor.” WaPo …

— Nausicaa Renner will be senior politics editor at The Intercept. She previously was digital editor at the Columbia Journalism Review.

— Mike Hixenbaugh (who will be based in Houston), Erin Einhorn (Detroit) and Anita Hassan (Las Vegas) are joining NBC as national reporters in the next month.

SPOTTED: Michelle Obama having dinner at Oyamel on Wednesday night. She organized a team dinner to celebrate her book tour: Chynna Clayton, Alex May Sealey (whose birthday they also celebrated), Mackenzie Smith, Melissa Winter, Kristina Schake and Caroline Adler. “Becoming” has sold 10 million copies.

OUT AND ABOUT — SPOTTED at a Snap reception Wednesday at District Winery in Navy Yard (where “guests were treated to a custom Bitmoji maker and Ghostface Chillah pool floats,” per a tipster): Peter Hamby, Nick Massella, Tal Kopan, Julie Henderson, Marie Harf, Tammy Haddad, Jill Barclay, Heather Podesta, Jen Stout, Logan Dobson, Doug Thornell, Alex Marquardt, Will Ritter, Tim O’Toole, Russ Caditz-Peck, Laura Howard and Gina Woodworth.

REVOLVING DOOR — “Rahm Emanuel, Ex-Chicago Mayor, Is Going to Wall Street,” by WSJ’s Liz Hoffman: “Former Chicago mayor and longtime Democratic operative Rahm Emanuel will join boutique investment bank Centerview Partners LLC, bringing a Rolodex built over a 30-year political career. Mr. Emanuel, who left office last month, will open a Chicago office for Centerview and advise clients on merger deals and other matters, he said in a joint interview Wednesday with Centerview co-founders Blair Effron and Robert Pruzan.” WSJ

TRANSITION — FIRST IN PLAYBOOK: Christina Pearson has joined Hamilton Place Strategies as a managing director. She most recently was senior director of public affairs at Microsoft.

BIRTHWEEK (was yesterday): Kara Hauck, a VP at Qorvis (hat tip: Kristen Thomaselli)

BIRTHDAY OF THE DAY: Katherine Faulders, White House and Capitol Hill reporter at ABC News. How she got her start in journalism: “My grandparents were both political reporters in Washington, and White House correspondent Helen Thomas was a good friend of theirs who I viewed as a mentor growing up. I watched their careers and always knew I wanted to be a reporter, and got my first internship when I was 15 working at a newspaper called El Imparcial in Oaxaca, Mexico, for a summer. I applied to a number of entry-level jobs in D.C. and a month after I graduated from college got a call from ABC asking if I could start the next week as a desk assistant on our assignment desk.” Playbook Plus Q&A

BIRTHDAYS: Eric Cantor is 56 … Natalie Morales is 47 … Michael Goldfarb … Margaret Kimbrell White (h/ts Nancy Jacobson and Jon Haber) … Max Docksey … Bloomberg WH reporter Justin Sink is 32 (h/t Andrew Beaty) … Emily Murry … documentarian Abby Ginzberg … Sen. Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.) is 67 … Rep. Madeleine Dean (D-Pa.) is 6-0 … Anna Epstein, VP at Black Rock Group, is 28 (h/t Carla Frank) … former Rep. David Bonior (D-Mich.) is 74 … Ariel Edwards-Levy, reporter and polling editor for HuffPost … Regina LaBelle … Florida Lt. Gov. Jeanette Nuñez is 47 … Meredith Barnett … Thomas Pritzker is 69 … Jocelyn White Martin … Rob Kuhlman … Eli Broad is 86 … Matt Heinz is 42 … POLITICO’s Kamran Rahman … Kelly Polce … Felicia Sonmez, WaPo national political reporter … Jacky Monterosso … CQ’s Caroline Simon … Snap’s Farrin Jay … Geoffroy Vitoux … Mehdi Peeters … Boaz Weinstein …

… CNN’s Kevin Liptak … AIPAC’s Allie Freedman … Jordan Finkelstein, senior associate at SKDK (h/t Dom Hawkins) … Heather McGhee (h/t Kelley McCormick) … Togolese President Faure Gnassingbé is 53 … Christopher Rowland, WaPo business of health care reporter … Leah Abrams … Vanessa Bajko … Sarah Frostenson … Anja Crowder Morice … Jay Westcott … Josh Taylor … Bloomberg Tax reporter Lydia O’Neal (h/t Anna Massoglia) … Sarah Gadsden, associate at Eagle Hill Consulting … Edelman’s Matt Cunningham and Graham Hardock … Jonathan Kopp … Amanda Muñoz-Temple … Donna Fenn … Kathryn Riccobono … Ben Keesey … Marlene English … Ben Holzer … Keith Perine … EY’s Jen Hemmerdinger … Carol Guensburg … Katie Visco … AU’s Joshua Rovner is 43 … Travis Brock … Bruce Colburn … Anne Sayers (h/ts Teresa Vilmain)

There are wrong and right prescriptions for changing Medicare. Seniors need Washington to focus on the right ones. There’s a lot of talk in Washington about changing Medicare to reduce costs. But while many proposals would cut costs for governments and insurers, they won’t cut costs for seniors; and even worse, they would limit access to the medicines that could save their lives – now and in the future. Cutting costs for everyone except seniors and limiting access to medicines are the wrong prescription for Medicare. On the other hand, making changes that help seniors pay less out-of-pocket are the right prescription for Medicare.

This article tagged under: